Changes!

It’s been a bit of a busy time for me, of late!

Rights were released to me for the following: The Éire’s Viking Trilogy, An Unexpected Woman, and Justin’s Second Chance. They all have new covers!

new cover collage with label

They are being offered on several different platforms. More information can be found on my new home: www.sandilayne.com.

I know, it’s a stretch. 😉

The first book of the trilogy is now available as an eBook for only 99 cents, while the others can still be purchased for $4.99. An Unexpected Woman is now only $2.99.

Something that isn’t changing, though, is my commitment to watching, live-tweeting, and posting about History Channel’s awesome show VIKINGS. Lissa Bryan and I will continue to follow, comment, and go all nerdy fangirl as the show moves forward after the death of Ragnar Lo∂brok. The show’s creators have been sharing teasers and the cast has been tweeting about Season SIX! Filming has already started!

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If you’re looking for our posts on this show, do a search here on my site for #VIKINGS here after clicking the menu icon on the top right corner. (As I’ve just reworked this WordPress site, this might change in the future as I see what might work better for the purpose; please be patient with me.)

I can still be found on Twitter at @sandyquill and on Tumblr at sandyquill.tumblr.com.

 

 

I’ll be live!

Cate & Friends Sandi LayneThis is one of those things that makes me super nervous, but I am going to be LIVE tomorrow night.

Past my bedtime and everything!

Questions forwarded to me (thank you, Cate!) include which characters were the first I killed in one of my books . . . fun stuff, no? And just how did I get into writing anyway? Because you know? I never planned on doing this . . .

True story!

Check out the info in the graphic above and consider yourself invited. Cate will be moderating audience participation, too, which is very kind of her. And optimistic!

 

The #ShieldGeeks Talk Vikings: Uncertain Hour

 

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“100% more evisceration talk than expected.” 
 

“These chicks are machines!” 

– Steve No Ship Network

(CHECK THEM OUT FOR THEIR PODCASTED RECAPS AND FEEDBACK ‘CASTS! And Yes, we did one, too!)


Heillir! The Shieldmaidens of History (Protecting the Innocent from Anachronisms) welcome you back to our series on the History Channel show Vikings. 

We—Lissa Bryan and Sandi Layne—are two historical fiction authors with a serious thing for Vikings.

Follow us on twitter, #ShieldGeeks, where and Lissa and I live-tweet during each episode, as has been our custom since Season One.


146a6-lissa-bryanLissa Bryan is a delightful historian as well as being a wonderful writer. Her latest book, Dominionis a dystopian romance taking place at a time in the not-too-far-distant future.


 

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Sandi: For reasons that will become obvious, I am half-inclined to add “In vino, veritas” to this week’s episode.

Lissa: This episode had a lot of… strange moments for me.

Sandi: Oh, it really did. On some of them I concur, even. Some humor, some pathos, some awkwardness, and some boot soles. It was a strange night.

Lissa: Lagertha is cheered as she walks through Kattegat’s main street toward Aslaug. Aslaug, adorned in her queenly robes, is standing there with the Shiny Sword on her palms. Even the Seer has come out to watch. Aslaug starts out by playing the victim. “How strange, Lagertha, that you should play the usurper. One woman against another.”

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Sandi: Even from the initial words, it was plain that his was not the showdown that had been hinted at in previews. History Channel VIKINGS previews are, though, notoriously misleading. Seeing the Seer out of his ritual space was a surprise. He’s taller when he’s upright than one is accustomed to seeing.

pic-two-epi-14Lissa: Lagertha sheathes her sword. “I was never the usurper. Always the usurped.”

Sandi: Now, that’s a lie, really. Lagertha could be said to have usurped her own demesne of Hedeby, back in the day. She provoked her husband into hurting her badly enough in public that she was able to strike him down and usurp his power and authority. This would be well known by each and every one of her listeners, as well. I think that here, she is laying a case for her vengeance in Kattegat alone, by saying she’d been wronged. In public. Which would be the right thing to do in terms of the law.

Lissa: Lagertha says that Aslaug stole her husband, her home, and her happiness. Aslaug retorts that Ragnar wanted to be with her, and Lagertha accuses Aslaug of bewitching him. Aslaug says that women have power over men sometimes, but she didn’t use any magic on him. Aslaug tells Lagertha that Ragnar is dead. Lagertha doesn’t want to believe it. Aslaug tells her she saw it in a dream. Lagertha retorts that she doesn’t KNOW for sure he’s dead. Aslaug doesn’t try to defend her völva powers. She smiles and says that Lagertha may be right. It was only a dream. In any case, Lagertha can have her home back. She will not fight. She’s not her mother, or her father. “I have fulfilled my destiny. The gods foretold Ragnar would have many sons. I have given him those sons. I am as much a part of his saga, Lagertha, as you are.” She tosses the sword at Lagertha’s feet. All she asks is that Lagertha give her safe passage to go wherever she wishes. Her sons, she says, will be grateful to Lagertha for it.

Sandi: I see in their exchange the equivalent of a courtroom proceeding, ending with an abrupt acceptance of the verdict as Aslaug tosses the sword at Lagertha’s feet. And then, we were expecting, perhaps, a cheer or a farewell scenario or something.

Lissa: Lagertha agrees and Aslaug struts away, her lips curved in a triumphant smile.

Lissa: She pauses at the end of the street, and her smile freezes. She starts to tilt forward and we see an arrow protruding from between her shoulder blades. As she falls, we see Lagertha standing behind her with a bow in hand.

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Sandi: I confess I was startled that Lagertha had done this herself. When I saw the arrow, I assumed that Lagertha had set up someone on a rooftop as she had done in the battle prior, someone who was ready to handle things if the legal proceedings got ugly. But that’s clearly not how it went down.

Lissa: I was shocked by this. It honestly didn’t seem to be Lagertha’s “style” to give safe passage and then shoot an enemy in the back. Every revenge slaying she’s ever done has been face-to-face and she’s kept her word about it. I could see her killing Aslaug on the spot, or even hunting her down afterward and making her life a misery, but this just didn’t seem “Lagertha” to me.

Sandi: Though I was startled, I was not put off by Lagertha’s action, here. I don’t believe it was the wisest thing she could have done (LagerthAthena she isn’t, apparently, owl companion not withstanding), but I got it. She had waited. She had bided her time. She had arranged her people and provided an appropriate venue, and she took her revenge on the woman who had basically been the impetus for upending her entire life.

That Ragnar is the ultimate guilty party is a given, but Lagertha will always love that man so she took her vengeance on the other woman.

Lissa: Aslaug is given the cinematic version of a Viking funeral – the boats and flaming arrows thing. Here’s where I wish they would have inserted one of those little historical nods and had Aslaug’s interment be the Oseberg ship burial.  The chanting was beautiful, though, as the Viking ladies add jewelry and other items to her pyre boat.

Sandi: Notice the absolute lack of horror at Aslaug’s public murder. Notice the apparent acceptance of Lagertha’s actions. This is, as Hirst is showing again, the 9th Century and the world was a different place back then.

Lissa: It was sort of an anti-climactic end to the queen people loved to hate. As I’d mentioned in our podcast, I was hoping they would continue with the Sagas, and Aslaug leading an army to avenge Ragnar’s death (in the Sagas, her sons, but since they didn’t die and Ragnar seems destined to…) I was hoping Aslaug and Lagertha could come to a truce and work together to avenge the man they both loved. What a journey that could have been! But, alas, it shall have to be explored only in fanfic now…

Sandi: Anti-climactic indeed, and a bit disappointing for that. But as you say, there’s always fan fiction! If History Channel had chosen to follow the female lines, this could have been an epic tale, but it is evident that the future story will follow the males and the legends and histories told of them. It is best that the show focus more tightly; exploring everything can be confusing.

Lissa: Ragnar tells the soldiers at the city gates to take him to Ecbert, and they will be rewarded for treating one of his friends well. He is soundly thrashed while Ivar watches. We next see him in a small iron cage, suspended off the ground a few inches. I couldn’t figure out why they’d bother with suspending the cage such a small distance off the ground, and Sandi swooped in to offer the answer:

Sandi: The imprisonment is clearly a petty (and effective) treatment, here. Ragnar’s entire demeanor is quiescent. The beating he received was vastly overdone under the circumstances and the imprisonment unnecessary except as a means to humiliate and unman him.

Lissa: Aethelwulf questions Ragnar, demanding to know where the rest of his men are. Ragnar says he killed them. He asks Aethelwulf to be kind to Ivar and appeals to Aethelwulf as a father himself. Aethelwulf snaps that Ragnar is an animal who deserves to be in a cage.

Sandi: Aethelwulf is suffering from an inferiority complex, and I can’t really blame him. Even beaten, filthy, locked up, and at the mercy of his captors, Ragnar exudes serenity and confidence as to his position. Aethelwulf has never had that kind of personal strength; he’s been held back for too long in his life.

historys-vikings-season-4-part-2-episode-14-ragnar-lothbrok-in-a-cageLissa: Ecbert has Ragnar, and his cage, brought into his hall. He wants to chat. Ragnar pleads to see Ivar, because he doesn’t know if his son is alive or dead. Ecbert nods, and two soldiers carry Ivar in and deposit him in a chair. He’s well-dressed and clean, and has no visible wounds. Ragnar asks him how he is, and Ivar tells him he’s fine. Ecbert offers Ivar some food and says that Ivar is his guest. He orders the soldiers to have Ivar treated well. Ivar is taken from the room. He calls over his shoulder to his father as he is carried away, “Don’t [mess] with them.” (The Viking wording might have been a little rougher, but both of our blogs are PG.) Ecbert asks what Ivar said and Ragnar replies that Ivar said “Thank you.”

Sandi: This was a nice little scene that did a few things. One, it reinforced Ragnar’s purposeful projection of his son being weak and unable to handle himself, which Ragnar is keen on making the public perception as we the viewers are aware. Ivar plays along, but only on the surface, as his native tongue conveys his true feelings. In a non-PG manner. 😉 This father and son are contrasted definitively with Ecbert and Aethelwulf. Ragnar might be the dominant figure, but he respects his son and works with him.

Lissa: Ecbert tells Ragnar that he’s sorry the Wessex settlement was destroyed by Aethelwulf, but it was, of course, done on Ecbert’s orders. He regrets it now. “Mea culpa. Mea maxima culpa.” But it was part of a much larger, long-term strategy.

b-historys-vikings-season-4-part-2-episode-14-ragnar-lothbrok-and-king-ecbert-670x447Sandi: His sincerity is as ersatz as Splenda® in my coffee. Which is to say, not at all effective or believable in place of the genuine article. And Ecbert knows Ragnar will feel this way (with appropriate, 9th Century equivalents) but he says so regardless because he also knows that Ragnar is a self-confessed corrupt fellow. Just like Ecbert himself. They understand one another so the words can be said for form without belief and, somehow, this works for them as a means of communication.

Lissa: He has Magnus brought in to meet Ragnar. The boy’s eyes are full of wonderment. Magnus tells Ragnar that his mother told him stories of his amazing father, and he can see now that the stories are true. Ragnar tells Magnus that his birth was truly a miracle, since he never had sex with Kwenthrith. After the boy leaves, Ecbert says he always had his doubts about the boy’s paternity. He asks Ragnar why it took him so long to return, and why he’s here now. Ragnar replies with Ecbert’s own words from earlier: it’s part of a larger, long-term strategy. Ecbert cracks up.

Sandi: Well, Magnus certainly looked as if he could have been lo, another Ragnarsson, but no! I wonder if the wonderful Amy Bailey knew that Kwenthrith hadn’t had sex with Ragnar in that memorable, erm, healing scene? I felt dreadful for Magnus here, as he was confronted with a fat lie. Ecbert, unsurprisingly, appears to have not a care in the world for how his charge-to-date might be handling the abrupt disclosure.

pic-four-epi-fourteenLissa: In Hedeby, Margrethe opens the door to Ubbe and Sigurd’s prison. She tells the boys they need to get back to Kattegat. The boys ride there and find Lagertha sitting in the great hall. She is wearing a red dress with a high black collar that immediately went into our “Boot Sole File” of anachronistic costumes. History Channel… There is just no excuse, man. No excuse.

Sandi: Yeah . . . No. The official title for this episode is An Uncertain Hour Before Morning, and I really feel the “uncertain” refers, in large part, to Lagertha. Or at least our perception of her. I wonder where her character’s arc is heading?

Lissa: They demand to know where their mother is and Lagertha is simple and direct: “I killed her. She took Kattegat from me. I wanted it back.” The boys ask why she didn’t kill them too, and she tells them that it’s not their fault their mother bewitched their father. Ubbe says it was a mistake not killing them. The enraged boys start fighting their way through Lagertha’s guards.

Sandi: One has to believe that Lagertha had known this confrontation was inevitable, hence her utterly calm demeanor as it went on. She had her defenses in place, as it were, from the implacable gaze to the bodyguard. Ubbe taking the lead in the attack, going so far as to shove his younger brother aside, did surprise me. Why not take the extra pair of arms? I think perhaps that Ubbe was just furious and he wanted to be uninhibited, not thinking about the defense of anyone else as he went on the attack.

Lissa: But they’re eventually taken down, and dragged out of the hall, unharmed except for some bruises. They lick their wounds with some mead by the fire. Ubbe wants to attack Lagertha. Go into the hall and finish her off. Sigurd scoffs. Aslaug wouldn’t have done the same for them. Her favorite was Ivar. And Harbard. He reminisces – or rather bitterly recollects – what a fool she made of herself over Harbard. Ubbe says that Lagertha should be made to pay for killing their mother, and Sigurd says Ivar will do it… If he’s still alive. They both heard what Aslaug said about the ship sinking and Ragnar and Ivar being killed. Sigurd laughs at that.

Sandi: This is part of the “in vino, veritas” theme that I found in this episode. Okay, so they’re drinking mead (have I mentioned before that it’s a favorite of mine?), but still. The young men are coming down off the adrenal rush of combat, imbibing alcohol, and they’ve a common enemy. Of course they’re talking rather more freely than usual and of course past experiences color everything. Sigurd carries a grudge against Ivar and his mother, having lived with the inequality of the various mother-son relationships in a more intense way than Ubbe did. He saw what Harbard did to Kattegat as a whole and in his own house in particular. Resentment will linger always, I think, though he knows that Ivar would be better at making anyone pay for wrongs against the family. Ivar has, after all, killed before. But he doesn’t believe his legendary father would die. And he likely believes that if Ragnar lives, so does Ivar.

Lissa: Back in Wessex, Ecbert is justifying himself. He says he’s united all of the small warring kingdoms in England. Which… he didn’t. And using “England” itself is kind of an anachronism, but we’ll just roll with it, because it’s that kind of episode. He tells Ragnar that he’s considered by the people to be the most dangerous man in the world. . He shares some food with the ravenous Ragnar, and some wine, and then unlocks the cage. Ragnar collapses to the floor when he tries to straighten up after several days in such cramped accommodations. It’s a reminder that they’re both older men, beset by bodily infirmity. Ecbert says he has to decide what to do with him. From his position on the floor, Ragnar says that the Seer prophesied he would die on the day that the blind man could see him. That means Ecbert must kill him.

Sandi: More of Ersatz Ecbert, here. Met by Realistic Ragnar. They are older, though, so there’s no invitation to bathe in the communal Roman pool. (Though I really wish Ragnar could get cleaned up a bit!) There’s merely the testing of weapons, verbal only, on the familiar foe.

Lissa: Aethelwulf escorts young Magnus out the gate of the city and hands him a small leather satchel. He tells Magnus it’s time for him to go off and learn to be a man.

Sandi: This scene, to me, is the most heartbreaking and troubling of the whole episode. The young man—boy, really—had been raised by a king, told he was the son of a legendary king, and he was innocent of harsh realities. Soft in feature and manner, his aspect also spoke of elegance of condition. He was a pampered scion. Until he wasn’t. And then he ws kicked out on his own without warning or any preparation whatsoever. This was deplorable, in my view, as the lad had done nothing wrong.

Lissa: Magnus is understandably bewildered. He asks where he’s supposed to go. Athelwulf essentially tells him that’s his job to figure out, and if anyone troubles him, to tell them that he’s Magnus, son of Ragnar Lothbrook, and everything will be fine.

Sandi: Really, I was speechless. My whole mind, as the mother of sons, was occupied with all the many ways in which Magnus could be hurt out there in the 9th Century.

Lissa: Magnus is like a dog dumped beside the road, with the owner blithely saying it will be fine, hunting rabbits and such, and driving away. He stands there sobbing in the rain, clutching his only earthly possessions, wearing clothes on his back worth more than the average highwayman will see in a lifetime.

Kid is frickin’ doomed.

Lissa: Aside from the cruelty of the situation, it doesn’t make much sense. He may not be the son of Ragnar, but he’s the son of Princess Kwenthrith of Mercia, and no one aside from Ecbert knows Ragnar disavowed his parentage. They can say whatever they like. And if they want the kid dead, why not kill him right there? After all, he could later return with an army at his back and press for his birthright from his mother’s line. Stranger things have happened throughout history. (Perkin Warbeck, anyone?)

Sandi: As you say, this makes no sense plot-wise (after all, Magnus was basically a non-entity before, so forgetting about him again in the show would work) or character development-wise unless it’s to show how heartless King Ecbert is. But we already knew that, right?

Lissa: Ragnar and Ecbert are drunk and having an existential debate about religious faith and our purpose here on earth. Ragnar says, in essence, that he’s come to Wessex to die. Ecbert throws up his hands. “You Vikings are incorrigible. You emerge from the womb with only one thing on your mind: How to die!”

Sandi: And here we have the beginning of another “in vino” scene!

Lissa: As we discussed last night, preparing for death was an important aspect of life in both cultures, especially in an era in which death was omnipresent, and could strike for seemingly no reason at all.

Sandi: Basically, it’s true. Ragnar made the point about the Christians being obsessed with death and the afterlife in this time as well, so the men are, once again, on par. Which they knew in advance of this part of the discussion. Their verbal fencing seems endless.

Lissa: The conversation turns to Athelstan, whom both of them loved. Ragnar says that Floki killed him for jealousy’s sake – because Ragnar loved Athelstan more. Ecbert says he, too, felt jealous, when Athelstan chose to leave with Ragnar instead of stay with Ecbert.

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Lissa: Ecbert brings in someone special, and he doesn’t need to identify him, because Ragnar instantly recognizes Alfred. The scene is incredibly tender, a moment of genuine emotion so rarely found in movies and television. Ragnar embraces the boy. It was a wholly unexpected kindness that Ecbert would share Alfred with Ragnar, giving him a living glimpse of the man they both loved and lost.

Sandi: I loved this scene. I had real tears and everything. Casting for Alfred was well done; the lad could indeed have sprung from Athelstan and Judith. We don’t know what the future Great King might have thought, for this moment was—unlike Magnus’s—not for his benefit. It was all for Ragnar.

Lissa: That night, Ragnar sits at the foot of his bed sleepless and we see visions of the sunlight sparkling on waves. Ecbert, too, is sleepless, kneeling before an altar and quoting Ecclesiastes. The King James Version, I might add. History Channel… We need to talk.

Sandi: I am wondering if the intent was not to have him quoting the KJV but a Latin translation from the Greek—which would have come from the Hebrew, in all likelihood. It would have been far less of a History Channel faux pas if they had had Ecbert at least begin quoting in Latin, transitioning to English for those of us who watch VIKINGS in that language.

joan-jett-epi-14Lissa: Ubbe and Sigurd wake up, probably with severe hangovers, and see Joan Jett perched on the edge of the bed they didn’t sleep in. She’s perky and resplendent in a gorgeously woven tunic. She tells them if they harm a hair on Lagertha’s head, they’re dead men. Ubbe replies that if they don’t fear Lagertha, why would they fear her? Joan Jett smiles slightly and flounces out.

Sandi: I’m still trying to get a handle on Joan Jett, here. Lagertha certainly hasn’t demonstrated a need for a bodyguard, but it seems Joan Jett is thus appointed. Her woven garment was indeed intricate and well made, but I took exception to the extraneous fabric on her left arm. It served no purpose other than for show, unless Joan Jett was trying to make an impression on Ubbe and Sigurd beyond the threat of violence.

Lissa: Ecbert tells Ragnar that he can’t kill him. He can’t let him live, but he can’t kill him, either. He just can’t. Ragnar suggests that Ecbert hand him over to Aella, and “wash his hands” of Ragnar’s death. More Christian anachronisms in my Vikings. Ragnar tells Ecbert to send Ivar home with a message for Ragnar’s other sons: that Ecbert did everything he could to stop Aella from harming Ragnar. Then the boys will focus their vengeance on Aella. You can see the wheels turning in Ecbert’s brain. What a lovely, convenient way to destroy Aella, and get rid of Ragnar, too.

no-ship-logoSandi: There is also a reference to lung ripping, and I am reminded that in legend, Ivar performs a blood eagle on Aelle. We discussed it a bit on the podcast we did with the awesome folks at No Ship Network. And Ragnar did use what we see as a Christian reference but the washing of the hands would have been a Jewish phrase in its initial use and, it is possible that Athelstan had used the phrase in the time that Ragnar had known him, so I’m leaning toward Ragnar’s using the phrase on purpose. Part of a larger, long-term strategy.

Lissa: He leans forward and says to Ecbert, “Do not be afraid.”

Sandi: And if we’re thinking of Christian phrases used out of place, this might be another one. Almost whenever an angel appears to people in the Bible, the angel says, “Do not be afraid.” This is often a harbinger for news from on high, but here . . .why does Ragnar say this? His aspect as seen below is hardly angelic.

 Season’s Greetings to all!


Thanks for joining us! Tune in next ODINSday for another episode!
If you’re looking for incisive comments, please check out ProjectFandom. @DeeDonuts on twitter is the chick in charge, there, and she always has sharp things to say!
 
Heill þú farir, heill þú aftr komir, heill þú á sinnum sér!
Hale go forth, hale return, hale on your ways! – Vafþrúðnismál 4


Novella on the way!

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I’ve got a new story coming out soon. 🙂

As you can imagine from the image above, it takes place during World War II, framed by more contemporary references for my main character, Rosemarie.

This is kind of a special story to me, as it is inspired by the personal memoirs of my Great Aunt, Rose Mary Pritchard, who was indeed one of many “Rosies” who were riveters during World War II. Riveting Rosie is not her story, but Great Aunt Rose Mary will definitely recognize Rosemarie. 😉

More details as I have a firm date of availability!

A Hidden Identity. . .

Wow, it’s December! Not sure when that happened. It’s been busy around here, that’s for sure! Today is my youngest’s fourteenth birthday, which is cool, but it brings home to me that he’ll be starting his high school career in the upcoming year. That’s kind of awesome. My older son will be getting a degree in graphic arts in 2016, all things being equal.

And I should be coming out with a new book. Shocking, I know. Here’s another peek at my upcoming historical fiction.

secret son blog title

“Tell me.” Muscles straining and flexing over his bones, Ruádhán ground the demand between clenched teeth. “Charis. Tell me.”

“Come.” With only a slight furrow on her smooth brow to illustrate her concern, the only mother he had ever known led him away, through the silent throng of villagers and visiting guests.

Behind him, though, he heard the whispers.

“Really? The usurper’s son?”

“Didn’t Ide marry him, all those summers past?”

“I remember her; her hair was like his. Just like. Why didn’t I see that before?”

“Tuirgeis’s son? The invader’s son? But he’s one of us!”

Ruádhán couldn’t seem to see beyond a tunnel of shadow that surrounded him. The only other living being, aside from Charis, he could see or hear was Mac Tire. The hound bounded up to him, licking almost frantically at Ruádhán’s clenched fist.

“Tell me,” he demanded again.

“When we get outside the walls, I’ll tell you, and not before.”

I am building a Pinterest board for this book. You can check it out, if you want. It’s here.

If you or someone you know is into Vikings, historical fiction, Ireland, romances, sword fights . . . all that fun stuff, consider adding the Éire’s Viking Trilogy to your reading and/or gift lists this holiday season!

Too Much Frosting?

So, I was doing some editing (okay, so I can’t really edit myself, but I can re-read, can’t I?) and thinking thoughts as I did so, because clearly, merely re-reading to look for ways to improve wasn’t making my brain busy enough.

I started to visualize writing as a cake.

Now, one can write a good passage and it’s like a fine, round, yellow cake. Light, airy, uniform in color and texture. A sweet treat to meet the requirements of “dessert” or what-have-you. There is nothing wrong with a plain cake. It can be lovely with a cup of coffee or tea or a glass of milk. Perfect.

freshly baked cake on white background

freshly baked cake on white background

Sometimes, though, we want to create more. So we add icing. A nice, smooth, complementary icing that we can spread with whatever flourishes we wish over our yellow cake. This dresses up the dessert, makes it prettier, perhaps, and more elaborate. A lovely presentation that is appropriate for many venues.

Occasionally, however, we are called upon to do more. We might add decorative touches. Flowers. Elaborate edible scrollwork. Edible metallic additions that make the cake sparkle. Or we might get exotic and use unusual toppings or compote and make our cake a work of art.

And all of this is lovely. It is.

In our writing, this is true as well. Making a passage an elaborate work of art can be gorgeous and a true literary experience.

But sometimes, we might have too much icing. Too many ambitious turns of phrase. Too many coy references. An overabundance of . . . something. In small doses, as with dessert, such things can be appealing and tasty and lovely to consume as one reads. But used too often, and there is a surfeit for which one can lose appreciation as the story goes on.

Sometimes, the most effective way of telling a story is just to tell it without decoration. To use strong verbs without a lot of pretty adverbs. To use names and basic pronouns. To use solid ingredients to let the flavor of the story reach the reader without a lot of interference.

And sometimes, it’s good to decorate.

A first draft is not the time to think about these things, for those friends of mine trying to finish a draft or those who are working on their NaNoWriMo project this year. A first draft is to get the words out. Get to The End. Get it done.

But later, when you read your work over, consider your presentation. Do you have too much frosting on the cake?

Want a peek?

So, I’ve been working on a new story. I wasn’t expecting to be writing this, to be honest, but my sister and I were talking it out recently (after having consumed some excellent chocolate) and I found a story in a person I had not considered writing for.

The story I’m now working on takes place in the same universe as my Éire’s Viking Trilogy. It is not meant to be a fourth book in a three-book series; it’s meant to stand on its own. We’ll see how that goes, shall we? The setting begins in Éire of the mid-9th Century and will move to Nordweg, as a young man seeks to learn about his father’s people.

His father was Tuirgeis. If you haven’t yet heard of him, check out my trilogy. He was a real person, but his son is entirely fictional. You can meet him here:


“Rúadhán! You great amadán! Get yourself on your feet so I can see you.” Her voice was nearer, its clarity unhindered by breeze or distance. He guessed she was within view if only he stood. So, reluctantly, he did.

blog copy tiarnan“Here I am, Charis.” He kept his voice low, for he didn’t wish to frighten the hiding hound any further. Pushing himself out of the tall grass to his feet, he jerked his chin up, knowing that his brighter-than-fire hair would do the rest.

The healer lifted a brow. “What do you think you’re doing out here?”

“I’m a man! I’ve been blooded in battle. I’ve taken Communion. I’ve done all I need to do to prove myself, Charis. Except to you.”

She snorted and made a deprecating gesture with one hand. “Rúadhán, I’ve been breathing air longer than anyone I know. You don’t have to prove your manhood to me. You just have to prove your sense.”


This is going to be a romance, and as it develops, I’ll share the heroine with you, too. 🙂 She might surprise you.

Favorite Season One Episode – VIKINGS

So sorry I lagged behind with this post. With the Valentine Weekend promotional stuff, I felt rather overwhelmed!

All Vikings images herein are the property of the History Channel. Click here to go there.

All Vikings images herein are the property of the History Channel. Click here to go there.

But THIS WEEK, my favorite show VIKINGS is back. Thursday night! So excited! If you aren’t following me on twitter but are interested in reading my live-tweeting comments with Lissa Bryan, come find me on twitter – the link is on my sidebar.

Today, I wanted to share with you my favorite episode from Season One of VIKINGS. The first season was fantastic for so many reasons. First, for me, was that it was the INVASION story. Ragnar went to Lindisfarne in episode two. [Link goes to my post where Lissa and I discussed this episode.]

vikings_athelstankidsIn this episode, we see how Ragnar the adventurer and navigator leads his men to England, where they hit Lindisfarne Monastery at the end of the 8th Century. Ragnar had definite goals in mind, but one he did not have was to find Athelstan, a young monk, whom he took as a captive.

This episode began a strange friendship between two disparate men that has continued thus far throughout the show.

ECM smallIn my Éire’s Viking Trilogy, I also tried to develop friendships and kinship between the Northmen and those whom they captured. In Éire’s Captive Moon, Tuirgeis (a Viking leader) captures Cowan (a prince of Ireland) and the two men have rational discussions, even about Cowan’s Christian faith. Tuirgeis eventually adopts Cowan as a brother. Through the course of my trilogy, the interrelationships between men of Ireland and the men of Norway are very important as the plot spins out.

My friends who have read my work for years know I have lain heavy hands on violence and/or death in many of my stories. But my real obsession, I think, is to find relationships between those for whom friendship (or romance, in some cases), is not a likely prospect. The challenge is to bend a story to my will, to bring characters through places that compel mutual understanding and appreciation, to show their best sides to one another as they learn to work together toward a common goal or purpose.

THAT is the delight of my craft, and I so enjoy seeing others—like the VIKINGS creators, writer, and producers—do so as well.

Sunday Sneak Peek – Éire’s Devil King

bbda3-sneakpeeksunday

Here’s another glimpse into the final book of my Éire’s Viking Trilogy!

EDK-Hi-Res-Cover

Summary:

A man of ability and ambition, Tuirgeis Erlingrson has nurtured the desire to carve a place of leadership for himself on the Green Island, Éire, that he has raided multiple times. After the death of his wife in Nordweg, he takes his surviving son to Éire. Having connections with his adopted brother, Cowan, and Agnarr, his former countryman, Tuirgeis feels he has the support he needs to make his claims strong.

Agnarr is torn. His promise to Aislinn to remain with her on Éire is still in force, and he resists Tuirgeis’s requests to join the conquering forces from Nordweg. He desires above all things to maintain a safe home for his wife and children in Dal Fíatach. Charis encourages Cowan to do the same, though this makes for tense moments between them.

After initial disastrous attempts to achieve his ambition, Tuirgeis comes to learn that there is more to claiming a kingship than merely overpowering the locals. Tuirgeis finds himself at odds with the very people he had hoped would reinforce him. In addition, he wants to establish his father-line. He has one son; he wants another to be born of Éire. Will the woman of his choice accept and support him?

Medieval battle smallerAt length, Agnarr and Aislinn—though she is heavy with child—sail with Cowan and Charis to join Tuirgeis as he battles over one final summer to attain the High Kingship of the island.

Tuirgeis knows he doesn’t have long to make his claims; the Danes are coming in greater numbers than before. As he wins men of Éire to his cause, he has to maintain the relationships he has already fostered with Agnarr and Cowan. Charis finds that her Otherworldly gifts are needed by a man she considers her enemy.

Excerpt:

When the Éire-men began talking in low tones in their own language, Haukr leaned toward Tuirgeis and spoke. “Will we gain treasure here?”

“No. But we need allies, and those we will find.”

“Allies.” Haukr frowned and resumed his former posture. “I thought we were after riches.”

“Patience.”

Agnarr caught his eye, offered him an interesting smile that seemed one part confident and one part amused. Cowan and the king exchanged another glance, and the latter translated while the former spoke.

“Did you think to settle all your men here?”

“Not all of them want to stay,” Tuirgeis assured the ruler. “However, some may winter here.”

At this, the king half-turned from the fire ring, beckoning to Cowan and Agnarr with a small, authoritative gesture. A quiet conversation followed, and Tuirgeis felt a small smile creep over his face. He let his gaze drift around the others in the round house. Charis’s pale skin seemed to almost shine in the gloom of the room as she stood back from the men around the fire. His smile fled as she studied him. He remembered her from their earliest acquaintance, on a longship where she clung to the bottom of the craft, her eyes vacant and staring over open water. Stubborn, she had been. Stubborn she had remained while yet a trell in Agnarr’s service. Stubborn she likely was, even now. Yet she had captured the heart of Geirmundr Kingson, and they had fled Nordweg together.

Wordlessly, he beckoned her over. After a moment, she came. It was true—he had thought she looked unchanged when he caught a glimpse of her earlier, and she certainly seemed to be so. Touched by Freya, perhaps.

“Lord Tuirgeis,” she said with a lifted brow. “And your son.”

Haukr jerked his head in obvious surprise. “You speak Norse.”

Ja,” she said, her tone sarcastic even on the single syllable. “I had no choice but to learn. You are Haukr.”

Astonishment froze Tuirgeis, but only for a moment. The woman’s sense of herself was even stronger than it had been in earlier years. She is a force to be reckoned with. “He is Haukr, my son. Haukr, this is . . . Charis, wife of my brother Cowan.” The two nodded politely at one another. “My brother treats you well, Charis?”

“Cowan mac Branieucc is a fair man. A good husband and father,” she replied.

“He is indeed. And how is your daughter?” It was mischief itself to ask, but he wanted the woman to exhibit some emotion. Her passivity was maddening. At his side, his son just stared at Charis, a look of confusion furrowing his unlined brow.

“Aislinn is well. She has made me a grand-dam twice over.”

Haukr leaned forward, mouth agape. “A grand-dam? Lady Charis, that isn’t possible. You cannot be much older than I.”

“It is true, nevertheless.”

Tuirgeis endeavored to keep his son from making a fool out of himself. He had a reputation to uphold. “You will find, Haukr, that Cowan’s wife is an unusual woman.”

EDK ebook pback smaller

This title due out April 2, 2015

from

The Writer’s Coffee Shop Publishing House

Goodreads * Add to Want To Read List

~~ABOUT THE AUTHOR~~

95366-sandi

Award winning author of short Celtic fiction, Sandi Layne is the creator of the Éire’s Viking Trilogy, as well as works of contemporary Christian romance.

She began by self-publishing her novels in 2000, garnering a loyal group of readers whom she continues to appreciate to this day.

Married for more than twenty years to a fantastic man, she has two sons, no pets, and a plethora of imaginary friends. Her interests range from ancient civilizations to science fiction. With degrees in English and Ministry, she also claims Theology’s crimson Masters collar which she has been known to don on rare occasions.

If you drive by her window before dawn, it is likely she’ll have a light on for you. Or at the very least, she’ll be alert on twitter. She invites you to visit her online space at http://sandyquill.com.

~~CONNECT WITH THE AUTHOR~~

~~OTHER TITLES IN THE SERIES~~

Cover Reveal – Éire’s Devil King

cool TWCS logo

PRESENTS. . .

A Cover Reveal for

Éire’s Devil King

Book 3 of Éire’s Viking Trilogy

by Sandi Layne

EDK-Hi-Res-Cover

Release Date: April 2 , 2015

~~SUMMARY~~

A man of ability and ambition, Tuirgeis Erlingrson has nurtured the desire to carve a place of leadership for himself on the Green Island, Éire, that he has raided multiple times. After the death of his wife in Nordweg, he takes his surviving son to Éire. Having connections with his adopted brother, Cowan, and Agnarr, his former countryman, Tuirgeis feels he has the support he needs to make his claims strong.

Agnarr is torn. His promise to Aislinn to remain with her on Éire is still in force, and he resists Tuirgeis’s requests to join the conquering forces from Nordweg. He desires above all things to maintain a safe home for his wife and children in Dal Fíatach. Charis encourages Cowan to do the same, though this makes for tense moments between them.EDK-3D-Open-Book-2

After initial disastrous attempts to achieve his ambition, Tuirgeis comes to learn that there is more to claiming a kingship than merely overpowering the locals. Tuirgeis finds himself at odds with the very people he had hoped would reinforce him. In addition, he wants to establish his father-line. He has one son; he wants another to be born of Éire. Will the woman of his choice accept and support him?

At length, Agnarr and Aislinn—though she is heavy with child—sail with Cowan and Charis to join Tuirgeis as he battles over one final summer to attain the High Kingship of the island.

Tuirgeis knows he doesn’t have long to make his claims; the Danes are coming in greater numbers than before. As he wins men of Éire to his cause, he has to maintain the relationships he has already fostered with Agnarr and Cowan. Charis finds that her Otherworldly gifts are needed by a man she considers her enemy.

~~EXCERPT~~

It was dark in the langhús, save for the glowing of the coals banked in the fire ring. Agnarr enjoyed his wife’s responsiveness to him, and when they made love, he never forgot to thank his new God for letting her live through the births of the children their bodies made together. Before the sun crept under the door and through the shutters over the new windows, they were smiling and silent and relishing the moments—he knew there would only be moments—before the children stirred in the bench-bed they shared.

Later, as their son and daughter began shifting restlessly prior to awakening, Agnarr sat up and blew out a breath. “Wife.”

“Yes, husband?” She joined him, finding his hand with hers in the shadowy enclosure of their private area.

EDK-3D-Paperback-1“We need to be ready. You need to be ready. You and the children.”

She sighed and shifted on the blankets so that she was looking directly at him. As was her habit, she continued to touch him with her fingers as she spoke. “I can fight. And you gave Dow a real knife at the Christ Mass.”

Discomfort tightened his stomach as he shook his head. “You need to be able to escape, just in case.” He knew far too well what would happen if someone found his attractive wife. Someone whom he didn’t know. Someone who would find her dark hair appealing and the tatú on her cheek mysterious and alluring. Someone who would want to take her as their leman, as he had once taken Charis.

Someone who might take his son as a slave.

Jaw tightening in anger, he shook his head again. Hard. “You know what can happen to you.” Her eyes were on his face, and he met their steady gaze. “And the children. You need to be able to get away. We should find a way to make you safe.”

Goodreads * Add to Want To Read List

~~ABOUT THE AUTHOR~~

95366-sandi

Award winning author of short Celtic fiction, Sandi Layne is the creator of the Éire’s Viking Trilogy, as well as works of contemporary Christian romance.

She began by self-publishing her novels in 2000, garnering a loyal group of readers whom she continues to appreciate to this day.

Married for more than twenty years to a fantastic man, she has two sons, no pets, and a plethora of imaginary friends. Her interests range from ancient civilizations to science fiction. With degrees in English and Ministry, she also claims Theology’s crimson Masters collar which she has been known to don on rare occasions.

If you drive by her window before dawn, it is likely she’ll have a light on for you. Or at the very least, she’ll be alert on twitter. She invites you to visit her online space at http://sandyquill.com.

~~CONNECT WITH THE AUTHOR~~

~~OTHER TITLES IN THE SERIES~~